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More on the proposed Mayport Cruise Terminal

I guess the JPA forgot about the 2004 TU article below.   Of course, now they have more time to try to work out a deal with the Mayport residents as the bills for the Cruise Terminal were deferred in City Council tonight.

Support weakens for a Mayport cruise ship port

By Christopher F. Aguilar
Shorelines staff writer

 

 A study commissioned last month by the Jacksonville Port Authority is looking at the village of Mayport as a potential permanent home for cruise ships.

Boats are docked at Mayport where the Jacksonville Port Authority is studying building a home for cruise ships. An internal analysis suggests the village may not be a viable site.

But the port authority’s internal analysis suggests the village isn’t a viable site because it would have to condemn or buy dozens of business and homes along the waterfront to build a cruise terminal.

Using Mayport as a cruise ship site would pose a number of problems, said port authority spokesman Robert Peek. “Our analysis shows there is no room at Mayport,” he said. “We would need 40 acres of property along the river. There is not 40 acres of undeveloped land at Mayport. We would have to buy homes and businesses.”

The port authority paid the consulting firm Han-Padron Associates $10,000 to analyze locations along the St. Johns River east of the Dames Point bridge to place a permanent cruise ship facility. The study is scheduled to conclude in a few weeks.

The city currently uses a converted cargo site off of Heckscher Drive as a temporary cruise ship terminal. But cruise ships must travel under the Dames Point bridge and JEA power lines to reach the facility. The cruise ships currently home-ported in Jacksonville, which are older and smaller ships, barely pass under the bridge’s and power lines’ clearance.

The two cruise lines that use Jacksonville as a port, Carnival and Celebrity, are phasing out their older ships and want to bring newer, larger ships to the city, which don’t fit under the bridge or power lines, Peek said.

So the port authority is searching for a new facility east of the bridge and power lines.

The port authority has found a site on Pine Island, a former spoil site near the Sisters Creek on Heckscher Drive, for a possible facility, Peek said. The privately-owned site offers 100 acres of property, he said.

Peek added that the St. Johns River Pilots Association thinks the Pine Island site is ideal for a cruise ship center.

Meanwhile, John Meserve, chairman of the Mayport Waterfront Partnership, said that because of political pressure, Mayport village has been suggested as a home for cruise ships.

The waterfront partnership is an organization that works to improve the appearance and economic development of the village and Mayport Road.

Peek said residents near Pine Island asked the port authority to consider Mayport village.

But the waterfront partnership took a stand against cruise ships in the village last week.

“We got a 1,000 feet of waterfront that is not city-owned,” he said. “There’s absolutely no parking for cruise ship-type things.”

Meserve said the cruise ship operation would destroy the village by bringing a high-rise building and using up a lot of the village for parking.

“To have an 800-foot cruise ship out there and pushing the shrimping industry totally out of the village doesn’t do anybody good,” he said.

Ed Lukacovic, a Jacksonville planner who oversees the Mayport area, said people who recommended the village for a cruise ship don’t realize how small the village is.

Board member Barbara Goodman said she thinks that Mayport village will be reviewed and then dismissed as a possible site.

Residents along Heckscher Drive also don’t want the cruise ship terminal.

“Don’t put it on our side either,” said Heckscher Drive resident Jessie Sammons.

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12 Responses - Comments are closed.

  1. jaxport says:

    Hi JaxPolitics,

    Jeff Price from JAXPORT here. The current plans for a potential cruise terminal in Mayport are much different than the initial concept considered in ’04. The earlier concept would have taken up too much of the Village’s acreage, so the idea was indeed discarded.

    The project presently under review would require one ship’s berth, a terminal building, and a multi-story parking garage, all of which would fit within 8 acres, or just 10 percent of Mayport’s total 80 acres.

    The current concept to build a permanent cruise terminal facility on the Mayport waterfront took form after we were approached by several private citizens interested in selling their properties. In April of this year, JAXPORT’s Board of Directors approved the purchase of several parcels of Mayport property. Combined with the former City of Jacksonville properties associated with operating the St. Johns River Ferry, these properties (about 8 acres in total) preserve our options to construct a terminal for cruise ships.

    It’s also important to note that JAXPORT’s Board of Directors has not given final approval for construction.

    Let us know if you need any other info. Thanks,

    Jeff Price, JAXPORT Communications
    office: 904-357-3049
    email: jeff.price@jaxport.com

  2. g8rluvr says:

    Hi Jeff,

    Thanks for joining us. I appreciate your insight and clarification of the proposed project.

    One thing you said at the end of your post brings me to a question that I continually have about the way Jaxport pursues projects. Why does the Port seem to spend alot of money purchasing property (or going through court proceedings to try to take it through eminent domain), lobbying cruise ship companies, going through all the rezoning and City Council efforts, all of which must cost the Port significant dollars and the Port’s Board of Directors’ hasn’t even given final approval for construction? That just seems backwards to me.

    As you can probably tell, I have been following the Port’s development through the papers, and as pointed out in the articles I have posted on the subject, with the signing of Mitsui and Hanjin the Port and the unavailability of property near the Port, it seems that the Port has pretty much boxed itself into a situation where if Jacksonville is going to have a Cruise Terminal it is going to have to be located at Mayport. Yet, the last I heard the Port could not get a long term commitment from a cruise ship company. Has that changed?

    Also, I have read that citizens have raised numerous concerns about traffic, smoke from the ship’s fuel burning, and the amount of raw sewage on the ship and how to handle all of this it.

    On the traffic issues: I believe David Kaufman has talked about the road improvements, but I wonder how you really handle so many vehicles coming and going pretty much at one time down what has basially been called a “dead end road” by Mr. Meserve. Even the Northside residents didn’t think Heckscher Drive could handle the traffic from cruise ships – and it’s certainly no “dead end road”. Also, how would all these cars affect travel times and routes during mandatory evacuations? It seems that I recall that when a developer was wanting to build on the Moody property in Atlantic Beach, they already couldn’t meet the evacuation times required in the event of a hurricane or other emergency. Will that be a problem with locating the Cruise Terminal in Mayport?

    On the smoke from the ships: I noticed David Kaufman was quoted in the Jacksonville Daily Record (http://www.jaxdailyrecord.com/showstory.php?Story_id=51374) on December 5th as agreeing to allow air quality testing the next time a cruise ship comes to port. When will the testing occur and will the results be made available to the public?

    On the subject of the ship’s sewage: do the ships have the ability to treat their raw sewage onboard? Where will the ships be unloading all the raw sewage or treated sewage (if they have the capability to treat it) from their trips?

    Finally, there was also something else you said that confused me. You said in your post that the Port was looking at a one ship berth. But on December 2nd, Rick Ferrin is quoted in the TU (http://www.jacksonville.com/tu-online/stories/120308/met_362915941.shtml) as saying the Port’s goal is to have three ships in Port and a fourth one part time. Will those ships be rotating in and out of that one berth? Or will the area be expanded to accomodate those ships in the future?

    Thanks again for coming online with Jaxpolitics, Jeff, and helping us and our readers understand the Cruise Terminal project better.

  3. jaxport says:

    Glad to be a part of the discussion! Let me first present an overview of what JAXPORT does, to answer your first question:

    ========================================
    Why does the Port seem to spend a lot of money purchasing property (or going through court proceedings to try to take it through eminent domain), lobbying cruise ship companies, going through all the rezoning and City Council efforts, all of which must cost the Port significant dollars and the Port’s Board of Directors’ hasn’t even given final approval for construction?
    ========================================

    Your first question really goes to the heart of our responsibility and mission as a state-chartered port authority, which says we’ll “contribute to the economic growth and vitality of Northeast Florida by fostering and stimulating commerce through the Port of Jacksonville. The mission will be accomplished through the effective and fiscally-responsible planning, development, management and marketing of the port’s assets and facilities.”

    So, what we do as a landlord port authority is plan for future port growth, develop new port facilities, lease out those facilities, and manage and then market those facilities to prospective shipping lines, carriers, logistics companies, manufacturers and distributors; as well as tourism industry organizations, travel agencies and passengers on the cruise side of the business. As a public agency, we do these things on behalf of our city and state to generate trade and tourism in Jacksonville, and thus support jobs for our community.

    Having the cruise industry in the city helps us fulfill our mission. With just one cruise vessel sailing from Jacksonville, the cruise industry has created an estimated 400 new jobs and more than $40 million in new annual economic impact for Northeast Florida. (2006 study by Martin Associates – http://www.jaxport.com/about/economic.cfm)

    The six members currently on our Board of Directors (7th still must be confirmed by City Council) are all leaders in the community who are very interested in providing ethical oversight and policy guidance to our Executive Director Rick Ferrin and staff as we fulfill our mission. The Board requires a significant amount of business and market information before they can make the decision whether or not to authorize cruise terminal construction. In other words, they want to make a good business decision on behalf of our city. They want to make sure it’s a good deal for the community, for Mayport, for JAXPORT and for the cruise lines. Toward that effort, JAXPORT’s staff has continued to study the issue, meet with both Mayport residents and business-owners in the area on an ongoing basis for more than a year, and vet the viability of the proposal before presenting to the Board.

    Regarding eminent domain, in our 45-year history as an organization, as far as I know, the Jacksonville Port Authority went through that process one time: for the Keystone Coal property. That industrial property in north Talleyrand sat vacant for many years, and there were possible uses for a terminal there for job-producing port activity in the breakbulk, auto processing or container business sectors. JAXPORT went through the slow-take process under the previous eminent domain Florida law (the state law was updated after the Supreme Court New London decision), which meant that first a judge had to rule whether JAXPORT had the right to take the property (the judge ruled that the organization did have the right), then a jury had to assign a value to the property. Under the slow-take process, after the jury assigned a value, we had the option to either purchase the property, or, not purchase the property; then pay attorney fees, etc. to the defendant to cover their costs. After the value was determined by the jury this year, JAXPORT’s Board and Sr. Staff decided not to purchase the property, and a judge will rule soon on what will be paid to Keystone to cover their costs during the proceedings. I’m not arguing for or against what JAXPORT has done in this case, these are just the facts as I know them.

    Regarding expenditures for lobbying cruise lines and rezoning efforts, I think that relates more to staff time than to monetary expenditures (an exception: our Sr. Director of Cruise Operations has $3,000.00 in the budget for travel related to cruise executive meetings for the entire fiscal year). Taken in context, that’s pretty small. JAXPORT’s annual operating budget last fiscal year was about $40 million.

    JAXPORT is a relatively lean organization at 150 personnel, half of whom maintain our cranes, equipment and facilities. The other half of our workforce – about 75 people – works in operations, security, IT, HR, finance, risk management, auditing, accounts receivable and payable, engineering, planning, cruise operations, marketing and external affairs. In terms of lobbying or rezoning, you’re probably talking about a handful of employees involved, 1 or 2 in some instances, and I would be surprised if they’re spending close to 100% of their time on that effort alone. Each employee at JAXPORT has a whole host of responsibilities that keep each of us busy.

    Speaking of which, you asked a great deal of insightful questions. I know the answers to some, and not to others, but I’m going to try and get as much info for you as possible. I probably only have the time to answer one or two a day – so that’s going to be my goal moving forward.

    Talk with you soon! 🙂

    Jeff

    jeff.price@jaxport.com
    904-357-3049

  4. g8rluvr says:

    Wow! Thanks, Jeff. That’s great information. We appreciate your taking the time to answer the questions so thoroughly.

  5. jaxport says:

    My pleasure. I answer two more below.

    ======================================
    As you can probably tell, I have been following the Port’s development through the papers, and as pointed out in the articles I have posted on the subject, with the signing of Mitsui and Hanjin the Port and the unavailability of property near the Port, it seems that the Port has pretty much boxed itself into a situation where if Jacksonville is going to have a Cruise Terminal it is going to have to be located at Mayport. Yet, the last I heard the Port could not get a long term commitment from a cruise ship company. Has that changed?
    ======================================

    In recent years, we’ve had expansion opportunities for port business here in Jacksonville. Many ports in the U.S. are indeed locked in and unable to expand. Dames Point was a big opportunity for us, and after years of marketing that potential, we’ve been able to secure good deals so we all can realize the economic benefits of the TraPac Container Terminal and Hanjin Container Terminal.

    So, I would say that it was not so much limiting ourselves, as it was taking advantage of the cargo expansion opportunities of Blount Island in the 70s, 80s and 90s; and Dames Point in this decade and in the decade to come.

    I talked recently with a former engineer and executive director of the JTA, who oversaw the Dames Point Bridge project in the 1980s. He agreed that back then, they never thought that cruise ships would be too tall to fit underneath the Dames Point Bridge. Likewise, the JEA power lines that bisect Blount Island and cross over Mill Cove and into Arlington provide the same air draft restriction – about 174 feet – that the bridge has. Today, 80 percent of the ships in the fleet of the “big 3”– Carnival Cruise Lines, Royal Caribbean, and Norwegian – are too tall to fit underneath the Dames Point Bridge, and that figure will only increase as older, smaller vessels are sold or phased out of service (exactly what happened here with the Celebrity Cruises Zenith and the Carnival Celebration).

    In 2004, engineering firm Han-Padron Associates studied potential cruise terminal locations at: eastern Dames Point, all parts of Blount Island, Bartram Island, Mill Cove marshland, Buck Island, Pine Island, and Mayport – pretty much every possible location east of the bridge to Mayport. JAXPORT’s own staff have studied each location as well.

    Unfortunately, each didn’t work out for a variety of reasons, until property owners in Mayport approached JAXPORT, and an idea was conceived for a single-berth cruise terminal there.

    So you’re exactly right when you say that the two choices we face now include developing a cruise terminal at Mayport, or not doing so and losing the cruise business in Jacksonville. This decision would have come sooner or later, even if our arrangement with Hanjin didn’t occur, because of the cruise lines’ trend to sell their smaller ships that can still fit underneath the Dames Point Bridge.
    In addition, I’m not aware of cruise lines engaging in long term contracts like the 30-year lease agreement we just signed with Hanjin Shipping Company. The cruise lines like to have the ability to adjust to market conditions. That said, their vessels are tremendous capital investments, so they’ll have to sail somewhere for quite some time to recoup those investments.

    And what better port than Jacksonville? We have a great geographic location. We’re at the crossroads of 3 major highways (I-95, I-75 and I-10), so it’s easy to get to and from our port. For that reason, and because cruise passengers don’t like to fly to get to their cruise, our city is a great drive-to market. More than 50 million consumers are within an eight-hour drive of Jacksonville.

    The cruises that have sailed from JAXPORT have typically sold out at an average of 110 percent occupancy. How do they figure higher than 100 percent? 100 percent = 2 people per cabin. So families are going on vacation and enjoying the cost-effective vacations offered by cruises here.

    In conversations with cruise line executives, JAXPORT’s leadership team is optimistic that the cruise lines will bring their newer ships here if a facility capable of handling them is provided. The major cruise lines have encouraged us to build a terminal without height restrictions.

    ============================================
    Finally, there was also something else you said that confused me. You said in your post that the Port was looking at a one ship berth. But on December 2nd, Rick Ferrin is quoted in the TU (http://www.jacksonville.com/tu-online/stories/120308/met_362915941.shtml) as saying the Port’s goal is to have three ships in Port and a fourth one part time. Will those ships be rotating in and out of that one berth? Or will the area be expanded to accommodate those ships in the future?
    ============================================

    Our leadership team sees potential in having three and a half ships calling the one terminal/one berth. Each of the three ships would have different itineraries and call Jacksonville on different days. The “half” ship would call JAXPORT for some portion of the year, like the Zenith did, for example, sailing from JAXPORT for six months out of the year. Three and a half ships is seen as the limit to the cruise industry niche we have here in Jacksonville. We don’t believe that we’ll ever replace the cruise ports of Canaveral, Everglades or Miami. But the cruises sailing from here already have proven that we do have a successful niche market for drive-to cruisers.

    Till next time-

    Jeff
    904-357-3049
    jeff.price@jaxport.com

  6. jaxport says:

    Two more answers to your questions below:

    =====================================

    On the traffic issues: I believe David Kaufman has talked about the road improvements, but I wonder how you really handle so many vehicles coming and going pretty much at one time down what has basically been called a “dead end road” by Mr. Meserve. Even the Northside residents didn’t think Heckscher Drive could handle the traffic from cruise ships – and it’s certainly no “dead end road”. Also, how would all these cars affect travel times and routes during mandatory evacuations? It seems that I recall that when a developer was wanting to build on the Moody property in Atlantic Beach, they already couldn’t meet the evacuation times required in the event of a hurricane or other emergency. Will that be a problem with locating the Cruise Terminal in Mayport?

    =====================================

    Actually, it was JAXPORT who prevented A1A from becoming a dead end road in Mayport last year, when we took over the St. Johns River Ferry to continue the connection between Mayport Village and Fort George Island.

    Generally speaking, cruise passengers get off the ship mid-morning and get on between lunchtime and early afternoon. This means they would be driving opposite the normal traffic flow of the area and would not add to any rush hour congestion. In addition, cruise passengers heading to or from a potential Mayport terminal would be urged to use both the Wonderwood Expressway and Heckscher Drive, meaning the ferry would also play an important role in the movement of passengers. This possible increase in ridership would improve the ferry’s financial health (the ferry loses $500K per year currently).

    Initial reports from the city show that those roads leading to Mayport have sufficient capacity to handle the vehicles projected to drive to and from a terminal there. As with any project we do, however, JAXPORT will continue to study road usage and needs in partnership with the Florida Department of Transportation and make plans accordingly.

    As far as evacuations go, I’m unfamiliar with the Moody property in Atlantic Beach. However, in short, I don’t think evacuations are pertinent as they relate to port operations.

    As a hurricane or tropical storm approaches our area, our safety and security teams stay in constant contact with the Coast Guard Captain of the Port and the Duval County Emergency Operations Center (EOC). It’s the Coast Guard Captain of the Port who determines what ship operations can continue and when they must cease, as well as when those ships must move out to sea, and when the harbor is closed.

    Based on our recently active storm history (particularly in 2004), port operations usually wrap up during condition X-ray, which is about 48 hours prior to a storm’s effects showing up in our area. No cruise ship or cargo ship is allowed to stay at JAXPORT’s docks during a storm (though we do have an agreement with the US Navy to dock some of their vessels at our Talleyrand facility during such an event).

    As storms are large events spanning hundreds of miles, if we were under threat of a direct hit from a hurricane or tropical storm, cruises would be diverted to other ports or postponed in our area in accordance with the Coast Guard’s direction.

    =====================================

    On the subject of the ship’s sewage: do the ships have the ability to treat their raw sewage onboard? Where will the ships be unloading all the raw sewage or treated sewage (if they have the capability to treat it) from their trips?

    =====================================

    Most important, there will be no discharge of sewage or other waste into Florida waters following a long-standing agreement between the state and the cruise industry.

    When we first began hosting cruises in Jacksonville in 2003, we included information about the cruise industry and the environment on our website, linked below. It’s still applicable today and certainly would continue to be regarding a cruise terminal in Mayport:

    http://www.jaxport.com/sea/c_enviro.cfm

    In addition, Carnival’s environmental practices (including their shipboard operations) are outlined here:

    http://www.carnival.com/CMS/Articles/environmental_virtual_.aspx

    We have several staff members who are passionate about preserving the St. Johns River as well as the overall environment, making sure that JAXPORT fulfills our mission in a socially responsible way. We have on staff both an environmental compliance manager, as well as an environmental advocacy manager. And, we either sponsored or participated in the following environmental projects from 2007 – 2008:

    Sponsored Greenscape of Jacksonville’s Annual Flowering Tree Sale. In 2008 over 7,000 trees were purchased and placed back into our community. Over the past two years, JAXPORT has sponsored several Greenscape events placing 27,000+ trees into the community.

    Participated in Jacksonville Community Council Inc.’s (JCCI’s) 2007 E3 (Environment, Energy and the Economy) study and task force recommending improvements to Air Quality in Jacksonville

    Participated in 38th Annual Earth Day Celebration event in Jacksonville educating thousands of people on green initiatives

    Sponsored St Johns Riverkeeper’s “River Friendly Yards” brochure to encourage community home owners to use green fertilizers for two years

    Supported Tree Hill Nature Center’s annual Butterfly Festival and other natural sciences initiatives including the printing of the new Bella the Butterfly book that will be placed in all elementary schools throughout Duval County

    Supported the Academy of Coastal and Environmental Sciences (ACES) at Terry Parker High School

    Sponsored the planting of a butterfly garden at Don Brewer Elementary School

    Sponsored the City of Jacksonville’s “Sail Jacksonville” event, April 2007

    Taught fourth and fifth grade students at John E. Ford Elementary about ways to help the environment, March 2007

    Planted trees and distributed 750 plants to the students at Fort Caroline Elementary School, February 2007

    Coordinated an effort with Greenscape of Jacksonville and RS&H to construct an outdoor tree classroom for Oceanway Middle School.

    We also have a short video with some of our employees talking about how we give back to the community. You can see that here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pgqylpum-U0

  7. Horatio Salazar says:

    I guess I wonder what the numbers would have looked like had the Port been able to keep Kia, Hyundai, and Volvo. It’s also worth noting that Mercedes doesn’t move their operations until 2009. That will most certainly have an impact on their car volume, don’t you think?

  8. jaxport says:

    Hi Horatio, While it would be great to just gain new ro/ro (roll-on roll-off) auto business and never lose any, it’s probably not realistic, just because of the tremendous competition between JAXPORT and ports to the north. While we had a relatively small number of Kia and Hyundai vehicles moving through our port for some time, the majority of those cars were always moving through Savannah/Brunswick, so it wasn’t a surprise when they consolidated all operations there. We worked with Mercedes for close to a decade, if not more, to grow their operation here, but they are the only car manufacturer that processes, or accessorizes, their vehicles off-port property in Jacksonville. Their cars come into Blount Island and then are processed at their plant in the Southside. All other vehicles coming into Blount Island or Talleyrand terminals are processed on port property, then delivered to dealerships in the US, or are exported.

    As I mentioned, competition is cut-throat with our neighbors to the north. But while Georgia and South Carolina can use tax dollars to pay companies to locate their businesses in their ports, JAXPORT – as one of 14 deepwater ports in Florida – operates more like a business, offering superior service while being fiscally responsible.

    And to JAXPORT’s credit, we’ve taken business from Savannah over the past couple of years, including new Mediterranean and African services from Nordana Line, for example. In addition, we’ve grown our ro/ro trade with new services from Abou Merhi Lines and ACL.

  9. jaxport says:

    Rounding up:

    =======================================
    On the smoke from the ships: I noticed David Kaufman was quoted in the Jacksonville Daily Record (http://www.jaxdailyrecord.com/showstory.php?Story_id=51374) on December 5th as agreeing to allow air quality testing the next time a cruise ship comes to port. When will the testing occur and will the results be made available to the public?
    =======================================

    This issue I’m least familiar with, out of all the questions you asked. What I know is that all of JAXPORT’s customers must adhere to local, state and federal environmental regulations. However, making sure they adhere to those regulations – the compliance function – is the responsibility of the appropriate enforcement agency – the local, state or federal office that regulates such matters.

    I think the article above referred to the City of Jacksonville performing the testing. While there are different tests that someone could perform – ranging from how smoky the stack’s puff looks, to an actual test of particulate matter in the air – I’m not sure what the City planned on doing.

    One thing to keep in mind is that in 2010, new international ship emission regulations go into effect under MARPOL Annex VI, mandating that all ships have a cap on sulfur content in their fuel, as well as a reduction in emissions.

    I think that covers all the questions you had. Glad I could shed further light on these important issues!

    Jeff
    jeff.price@jaxport.com

  10. g8rluvr says:

    Hi Jeff-

    Thanks for all the great information on Jaxport and the proposed cruise terminal. That answers alot of my questions. I do have just a couple of follow up questions.

    On the sewage and waste issues, I read the links you provided and from my reading of it, it appears as if the sewage and other wastes will be offloaded from the ship. I’m presuming that offloading will take place at Mayport. I’m wondering how it will be offloaded and where the wastes will be sent. Maybe I missed it somewhere.

    On the air issue, puffs of smoke tests – that’s a new one on me. Is that like sending messages by smoke signals in the movies? lol

    Here’s the paragraph from the Daily Record about the testing:

    “David Kaufman, the Port Authority’s senior director of planning and properties, and Tony Orsini, the Port’s senior director of cruise operations and business development, agreed to allow air quality testing the next time a cruise ship comes to port and to allow a 500-foot space for public use in the new terminal with the area closed prior to a ship’s arrival and opening back up after the ship departs.”

    Can you find out from either David Kaufman or Tony Orsini about the air testing. According to the Carnival schedule, a ship was in port on December 4th, 8th, and 13th – at least a ship was scheduled to depart the port those dates. Was the City out to test – and if they were, what were the results? If the City wasn’t out, can you find out when they will be? Here’s the schedule: http://www.jaxport.com/pdf/schedule_carnival.pdf

    Thanks again for taking the time to provide us and our readers with all the information that you have so far.

  11. jaxport says:

    Back again – I’ve just wrapped up our winter edition of JAXPORT Magazine – and that’s delayed me in answering a bit.

    I encourage you to check out this Dec. 9, 2008 statement from Carnival, which goes into further detail about how they treat and dispose of waste – it also has some info about their air emissions:

    http://jaxport.files.wordpress.com/2008/12/carnival12092008.pdf

    Regarding the air quality testing, I think the way the article was written might leave the perception that JAXPORT has some measure of control over the testing. What I was able to confirm is that it is indeed the City who is responsible for the testing. However, what department, what test they would perform, and how and when they would do it, I’m not sure. These are all questions most appropriately answered by the City, as they’re the local regulatory agency who not only has responsibility over this, but presumably has the staff to perform such testing and analyze test results.

    Including my previous comments and the info here, this is all the environmental info I’ve been able to glean internally to date as well as from my own online research. It’s probably evident that my personal expertise lies less with environmental regulation and enforcement than with the port’s mission, the advantages of shipping through JAXPORT facilities, and the economic benefits that our port facilities bring to the area.

    But I’m glad I could provide some info! (if about 4,000 words qualifies as “some” 🙂

    I encourage you to attend meetings about the future of the cruise industry here in Jacksonville to report on these items first-hand, and, if you’d like, I can schedule a port tour for you or other interested parties, so you can see JAXPORT’s cargo and cruise terminals in action. The tour might be helpful to see how the waste management process is handled when a cruise ship is in dock.

    Always feel free to contact our staff directly as well for more info:

    http://www.jaxport.com/misc/contact.cfm

    Thanks again for all you do!
    Jeff
    Jeff.price@jaxport.com

  12. g8rluvr says:

    Jeff,

    Thanks for providing all the information – and in such an understandable and straightforward way. We appreciate you searching out and providing answers, even on topics you weren’t familiar with. 🙂 I’ve got a much better understanding of the proposed cruise terminal now. And I’m sure our readers do as well!

    With the holidays, we don’t have time to tour the port, but hopefully after the first of the year we’ll be able take you up on your offer.

    Thanks again.

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